SECTION 9

EDITH LIZETTE TIMOTHY (1864 - 1943) AND PEARSON FISHER (1958 -1931)

and information, at end of this section, on the JAMES FISHER SHIPPING LINE and other Fisher connections.

Edith Lizette, the fourth child and third daughter of Peter Vincent Timothy and Elizabeth Hutchings, born on the 12 March 1864, was the first to be born at Markyate Street, Caddington, the earlier births being in London and Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire. Markyate Street is a small town partly in the Parish of Caddington, Beds., the rest being in Herts. Pigots Directory for 1830 states "The town has nothing to boast of in outward shew, being composed of one long street, many of the houses of which are unconnected and rudely built, but the vicinity is very respectable and enlivened by fertile scenery and pleasant residences"

The registration details are Entry No. 177, District of Luton in County of Bedford in the year 1864. They were taken from a note found in my mother's papers which indicated that it was her mothers birth details, Beatrice Eveline Timothy, which caused some confusion. The note goes on the read " PS Blanche, Yourself and .... All born at the same place - Have copy of birth certificate of Edith Lizette.

It is said that when Edith Lizette was on holiday in the Morecambe area of Lancashire with her father, mother and sister Blanche and when they were at Church, two young boys named Fisher fell in love with the two girls. This romance was carried on in the strict Victorian manner. Blanche was not too keen on the brother Joe as she felt that he was not good enough for her and the romance did not proceed. Joe became a successful architect over the years and moved to Bournemouth with his mother and widowed niece.

Pearson Fisher married Edith Lizette on the 31st March 1891 at the Catholic Apostolic Church, Hulme in the Chorlton district of Manchester. He was 32 and she was 26 at the time. His address was given as 98 Bank Road, Bootle. (Lancs) and Edith Lizette's as 5 Derwent Terrace, Brookes Bar, Stretford, Manchester. (The address where her brother, Eustace Bertram died in May 1892, and it is supposed that this was the address of her father) but, in fact, her father was recorded at the 1891 Census at 95 Wallgate, Wigan being with Annie Webb.

Edith Lizette had been with her mother, Elizabeth, at the time of the 1881Census in Southport whilst her father was at 122 Rochdale Road, Manchester with Mary Cooke, it is doubtful that we will be certain of who was actually living where! Beatrice Eveline, her sister, was present at the marriage as a witness. Edith Lizette died in 1943 and Pearson in 1931. There were probably 11 children, Pearson Vincent, Thomas Chamely, Edith Isabella, Adrian Cecil, Evelyn Mary, Frank Amstel, Violet Laura, Iris Jessie, Valentine, Archibald? and James.

 

 

      Pearson Vincent Fisher

1901 census see below

PEARSON FISHER (1858 - 1931)

Pearson Fisher was born on the 27th March 1858at Salthouse, Dalton, Lancs. He was an apprentice at the Barrow Shipbuilding Yard, then leading Draughtsman and Designer and became the Manager of Arroll Johnson of Dumfries who made Aircraft and Cars. He died on 22 September 1931.He is shown on the :

1881 census
as living with his parents, aged 23, a Marine Engineer, at 38 School Street, Barrow in Furness.

1891 Census at Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire. Address was in Buxton

JONES, William Head Married M 61 1830 Mining Engineer & Certificated Colliery Manager
Dawley
Shropshire
JONES, Harriett Wife Married F 59 1832 Boarding House Keeper
Dawley
Shropshire
JONES, Mary L Daughter Single F 36 1855 Boarding House Assistant
Wellington
Shropshire
JONES, Ruth A Daughter Single F 21 1870 Boarding House Assistant
Nuneaton
Warwickshire

FISHER, Pearson Boarder Married M 33 1858 Engineering Works Manager
Barrow in Furness
Lancashire
FISHER, Edith L Boarder Married F 27 1864

They surely were on their honeymoon as they were married on 31st March the census date.

1901 census at Wilford Lane, South Wilford, Nottingham, a General Manager at Engineering Works, aged 43, born Barrow in Furness with wife Edith (Lirette) Lizette, Mechanical Engineer!, aged 37, born Markgate St, Beds. & children, Pearson Vincent, aged 9, born Liverpool & Thomas Chamley, 7, born Liverpool & Adrian Cecil, aged 6, born Liverpool & Edith Isabella, aged 4, born Amsterdam & Evelyn Marty, aged 3, Glasgow & Frank Amstel, aged 2, born Renfrew & Violet Laura, aged 9 months, born Renfrew

This next section on Pearson Fisher contributed by Peter Vincent Addyman.

 

Pearson Fisher (1858 - 1931) By Peter V Addyman

Pearson Fisher was born at Salthouse, Dalton-in Furness, Lancashire on 27th March 1858, the son of Thomas Fisher, a maltster, master and proprietor of houses, and of Isabella Fisher, nee Chamley. Pearson had an elder brother Joseph James Fisher and two younger brothers and two younger sisters.

The Fisher family is an extensive one in south west Cumberland (now Cumbria) and the Furness District of Lancashire, Thomas' immediate antecedents being said to have derived from the area round Ulpha in the Duddon Valley. Pearson's family also claimed connections with James Fisher and the James Fisher Shipping Line, based in Barrow-in-Furness.

During Pearson's childhood Barrow expanded rapidly from a small place of perhaps 2000 people to, with the establishment of a steelworks, docks and a ship building industry, a burgeoning town of 47,000 people at the 1881 census.. The Barrow Shipbuilding Company was established in 1871 and Pearson was apprenticed there, becoming leading draughtsman and designer. He is shown on the 1881 census as a Marine Engineer aged 23, living with his parents at 38 School Street, Barrow-in Furness [ 1.].

Later in his career Pearson specialised in the design, manufacture and erection of refrigeration equipment. He joined the Siddeley Ice Tank Co Ltd in Liverpool and was involved in the design and construction of the second ice skating rink in Glasgow. By the age of 32 he was living at 98 Bank Road, Bootle, Lancashire. He and his brother Joseph had met two sisters Blanche and Edith Fisher, daughters of the surgeon and physician Peter Vincent Timothy, by family legend in church while the two girls were on holiday at Morcambe. Blanche rejected Joseph's approaches, but in due course, on 3st March 1891, Pearson married Edith Lizette, then aged 26, in the Catholic Apostolic Church, Hulme, in the Chorlton district of Manchester[ 2. ]. The Catholic Apostolic Church was a 19th century evangelical sect of which Pearson eventually became an elder - a deacon. The 1891 census, taken on 31st March, shows them living as boarders in Buxton, surely on their honeymoon as this was their wedding day.

Pearson and Edith soon began a family and their first three sons Pearson Vincent, Thomas Chamley and Adrian Cecil were born while they lived in Liverpool, in 1892, 1893 and (?) 1895 respectively. Thereafter the family spent several years in Holland where Pearson was chief technical advisor to the Dutch government on the draining of the Zuider Zee, concerned with the design and execution of engineering work. While they were in Holland their first daughter Edith Isabella was born, probably in 1897. Edith was technically a Dutch citizen and thus, during the second world war, considered an alien, a cause of problems for her.

Pearson and his family returned to Britain by 1898. He had in due course become an Associate Member of the Institute of Civil Engineers and an Associate Member of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers (AMICE, AMIME) and he was employed in a managerial capacity of a number of well-known firms, first in the Glasgow area, where the family lived at Renfrew and where his daughter Evelyn Mary, son Frank Amstel and third daughter Violet Laura were born. The firms for which he worked included Messrs Edward Chester and Co Ltd whose works he erected.

By 1901 the family had moved to Nottinghamshire and Pearson had become General Manager of Messrs Manilove, Alliot and Co's Bloomsgrove Works at Radford near Nottingham. Manilove Alliot specialised in centrifugal hydro-extraction equipment used in the laundry, textile and West Indian sugar refining industries. The family was living nearby at Wilford Lane, South Wilford, Nottingham at the time of the 1901 census, now numbering seven children.

Pearson's obituary [ 3. ] records that he subsequently worked once again for a number of firms in the Glasgow area. This was at a time when Glasgow had recently become the second city of the British Empire, was a globally-important centre for all kinds of engineering activity and an excellent place for a skilled senior engineer to develop a career. The first of Pearson's Glasgow area posts was with Mirrlees Watson Co Ltd in Glasgow. Mirrless Watson were amongst other things concerned with the manufacture of sugar machinery, and the special expertise he had gained in this field at Manilove Alliot may have led Pearson to this post. He later worked for John Brown and Co Ltd the famous ship building firm at Clydebank and subsequently with Denny and Co Ltd at Dumbarton. During this period the family, now living at 33 Edmiston Drive near Ibrox in Glasgow, continued to grow with the birth of Iris Jessie and Valentine, and a child Archibald who died in infancy.

Pearson and his family, now numbering nine children, left the Glasgow region in January 1914 on his appointment as technical engineer with the Arrol-Johnstone Engineering Company Ltd at Heathhall, Dumfries. He remained with the Company, by then called the Arrol-Johnston and Aster Company Ltd, until his retirement at the age of 71 in 1929.

The company grew from a syndicate formed between Sir William Arrol, designer of the Forth Bridge and George Johnstone, later joined by William Beardmore, who produced small cars between 1898 and 1915. The Arrol Johnston Company's Heathhall Works had been opened in 1913, just before Pearson joined the company, specifically for the manufacture of a middle-of-the-range car in Scotland. The General Manager Thomas Pullinger's speech at the opening of the new factory [3.] described the area as good for the health of the workers, with materials easy to obtain, facilities for despatch of finished goods unrivalled and with no problem in finding staff. With the advent of the First World War this state-of-the-art factory was diverted to the production of war materials including the development and production of the Beardmore Atlantic Aero engine and subsequently the BHP (Beardmore Halford Pullinger) and Galloway Atlantic engines. After the war the company was acquired by Beardmore's and the Dumfries factory, working with the Beardmore factory in Glasgow, was, with Pearson amongst the senior management, one of the most productive of British aircraft firms.

Pearson and Edith's four eldest sons were of service age during the First World War and all served in the army. Pearson junior was involved in the Dardanelles campaign where he was wounded, lost for three weeks, and seems to have survived by the gruesome circumstance that his gangrenous leg was 'cleansed' by maggots. Thomas was blown up in the trenches, buried for three days, rescued and invalided back paralysed, He was eventually nursed back to health and movement by his physician-surgeon grandfather Peter Vincent Timothy in Great Yarmouth. Frank survived a direct hit, the bullet being deflected by his metal card case. Evelyn joined her father's workforce at Arrol-Johnston, working as a chemist in the testing laboratory. It was here she met her future husband Erik Addyman, an aircraft designer seconded to Arrol Johnstone's from the Admiralty.

Pearson and Edith's family seems to have been a tight-knit one, Edith devoting most of her time to domestic matters and according to family memory being the disciplinarian. Pearson seems to have enjoyed less formal relations with his children , enjoying singing and sharing the jokes which seem to have been a constant of family life.

Most of the children married during the 1920ies. Evelyn, the first to leave the nest permanently, married Erik in 1920. She seems to have been her father's favourite and he felt her loss keenly, evidently asking Erik whether he wouldn't perhaps marry one of the other girls instead.. Pearson, more or less mobile again following the loss of his leg, worked initially at Harland and Wolfe in Belfast then returned to Dumfries where he managed the British Legion. He married Mary Ronald McIntyre MacKie in 1925. Thomas, who had an early career as manager of music halls first in Dumfries (?) then in Glasgow, married Florence Andrews in 1925 and worked in motor manufacturing with Lord Nuffield's Morris Motors in Birmingham. Adrian married Jinty Tollerton and followed a career as a local civil servant working in employment exchanges and the National Health Service. Frank became a banker, progressing to Chief Cashier at the Royal Bank of Scotland's London head office in Bishopgate and marrying Florence Defies. Edith, who never married, became a civil servant based in London. Violet married Alfred Jones who worked with Hillman Cars, later the Rootes Group, living in Coventry. Iris married Arthur William (Bill) Brown, living initially in 48 Grayston Avenue, then in the family home Stanley Villa in Rochell Park, Maxwelltown, Dumfries. All Pearson and Edith's surviving children produced offspring, in due course numbering 28. These have in turn generated over 40 great grandchildren.

Pearson, remembered by his grandchildren as by then a kindly though latterly ailing elderly gentleman, died aged 73, two years after his retirement from Arrol Johnstone and Aster, on 22nd September 1931 and was buried in Troqueer churchyard, Maxwelltown where, about 12 years later, his widow Edith was also buried.


 

Notes

[ 1.    ] Much of this account is based on an account prepared by Guy Martin Martin and Timothy Family Histories (Sections Timothy Family 6: Peter Vincent Timothy and Elizabeth Hutchins and 9: Edith Lizette Timothy)

www.martinfamilyhistory.co.uk

[ 2.     ] For Edith (Timothy) Fisher see P V Addyman, 2008. Edith Lizette Fisher, nee Timothy (1964 - 1943)

[ 3.     ] The obituary is preserved in a newspaper cutting, possibly from the Dumfries Courier, dated September 31St 1931. The obituary may possibly have been written by Pearson's son-in-law Bill Brown who worked for this paper.

[ 4 ] For Edith (Timothy) Fisher see P V Addyman, 2008. Edith Lizette Fisher, nee Timothy (1964 - 1943)

[ 5. ]  The obituary is preserved in a newspaper cutting, possibly from the Dumfries
Courier, dated September 31st 1931.  The obituary may possibly have been written by Pearson’s son-in-law Bill Brown who worked for this paper.


Relationships in the Addyman family

Pearson Fisher (1858 - 1931) was:

The father of Evelyn Mary Addyman (nee Fisher) (1898 - 1962)

The grandfather of James Cadwalader Addyman (1923 -2002), Oscar Thomas Addyman (1924 -     ) and Peter Vincent Addyman (1939 -     )

The great grandfather of

Robert James Addyman

Rosemary Anne  Addyman

Susan Diana Addyman

Judith Amber Addyman

Hazel Miriam Addyman

Patricia Anne Addyman

Peter Erik Charles Addyman

Michael Lee Addyman

Christina Louise Addyman

Thomas Oliver Addyman

Susannah Mary Addyman

The great great grandfather of the children of the above named
 

ARROL- JOHNSON notes from Guy Martin

In 1898 the 'Mo-Car Syndicate Ltd' of Glasgow was registered, with financial backing from the Coats cotton family and Sir William Arrol, civil engineer
and builder of the Forth Bridge, with George Johnston as the engineering director, to manufacture Arrol-Johnston motor carriages, the first of which was
 sold around the end of 1899.

Large, high, and horse-drawn in appearance, with substantial artillery wheels shod with solid-rubber tyres,
the cars were also technically unorthodox. The rear-mounted engine had only two horizontal cylinders but four pistons,
a pair to each cylinder, working in opposition to each other with combustion taking place between them. Cars of this pattern
continued in production until 1905, and in that year a more modern looking car but fitted with the old pattern engine at the front
won the first Tourist Trophy race, beating a Rolls-Royce into second place.

Arrol-Johnstons sold steadily throughout the 'Edwardian' era, particularly the four-cylinder 15.9hp with its dashboard radiator
that was produced from 1909 until 1915. Post-war saw the onset of a long decline which an amalgamation with Aster in 1927 failed to halt.

...................................................................................................................................................................................................

Edith Lizette Fisher, nee Timothy (1864 - 1943)
By Peter V Addyman

Edith Lizette Fisher, the fourth child of Peter Vincent Timothy and Elizabeth Hutchins, his wife, was born in Markyate Street, Caddington, on the Hertfordshire/Bedfordshire border near Luton on 12th March 1864 [ 1. ].

Edith's father, the son of David Timothy a London cabinet maker, upholster and bed feather merchant of Welsh extraction, was a physician and surgeon, being Public Health Officer for Luton at the time of Edith's birth. Her mother was the daughter of William Hutchins, a labourer from Boveney near Dorney, Buckinghamshire.

Peter and Elizabeth subsequently had five further children though in due course they separated, probably by 1881, and Peter had other children through later partnerships. Edith and six of her siblings are recorded in the 1881 census as living with their mother in Southport, Lancashire, while her father was recorded as living in Manchester.

A family story relates that Edith, her father, mother and sister Blanche were on holiday in the Morecambe district of Lancashire. While attending church the two girls caught the eyes of two brothers Joe and Pearson Fisher. Blanche proved resistant to the charms of Joe, whom evidently she thought not good enough for her, but Edith, now aged 26, married Pearson on 31St March 1891 at the Catholic Apostolic church at Hulme in the Chorlton district of Manchester. She is recorded at this time as living at 5 Derwent Terrace, Brookes Bar, Stretford, Manchester, presumed to be her father's address.

Pearson Fisher [ 2. ], a Cumberland man, was an engineer who had served his apprenticeship at the Barrow Shipbuilding Company, being recorded in the 1881 census as a marine engineer living with his parents at 38 School Street, Barrow-in-Furness. By now, however, aged 32, he was specialising in the design, manufacturing and installation of refrigeration plant with the Siddeley Ice Tank Company Ltd at Liverpool. He was living at 98 Bank Road, Bootle[ 3. ].

Edith and Pearson began a family more or less immediately. Their eldest three children, Pearson Vincent, Thomas Chamley and Adrian Cecil, were all born in Liverpool. Pearson in due course took a new post with the Dutch government for which he was Chief Technical Adviser on the draining of the Zuider Zee, concerned with the design and execution of engineering works involving lock gates. Edith's fourth child, called Edith Isabella, was born in Holland, a fact which later caused her problems - because she was technically an alien - during the Second World War. Evelyn Mary was born after their return to Britain, in Partick, Glasgow. Frank Amstel, their sixth child, was born in Renfrew, his name reflecting nostalgia, perhaps, for Holland.. There followed two girls, Violet and Iris, and two boys, one of whom, Archibald, died in infancy, the other being Valentine.
 

Pearson's peripatetic engineering career took the family to a number of homes. In Nottinghamshire they lived at Wilford Lane, South Wilford, Nottingham when he was General Manager at Manilove, Alliot and Co. They were at Renfrew when he was variously with John Brown and Co of Clydebank, and Denny and Co of Dumbarton. His final post was with Arrol-Johnston Ltd at Dumfries whither the family moved in January 1914. Edith and Pearson's family home there was at Stanley Villa in Rochell Park in Maxwelltown. This is one of a row of sober and decent red sandstone Edwardian houses giving views down the Nith Valley towards the distinctive mountain Criffel.

Edith's four eldest boys were all of service age by the outbreak of the first world war and all saw service. Pearson junior, tall, well-built and of considerable athletic prowess, found himself in the Dardanelles Campaign where he lost a leg, having been crushed by a train at the buffers, and was invalided home. Thomas, blown up in the trenches, survived burial for three days, though paralysed, and was eventually nursed back to health and movement by his grandfather Peter Vincent, now at Great Yarmouth. Frank was shot but saved from serious injury by a silver card case which diverted the bullet. Adrian also survived the war. Pearson Senior himself, in charge of Arrol-Johnston, a major engineering works, soon found its products swiftly altered towards war production, and he was able to find a position for his second daughter Evelyn as a chemist in the Company's testing laboratory. Evelyn here met her husband Erik, an engineer seconded to Arrol-Johnston's from the Admiralty on war work, and their marriage followed in 1920.

The 1920ies in fact saw the start of a succession of marriages. Pearson Junior married Mary McKie in 1925. In addition to Mary's existing child Dolly, known as Dorothy they produced six grandchildren for Edith. Pearson in due course returned to Dumfries where he was manager for the British Legion Club, living at its headquarters in Manoah House. Thomas, whose career was with Morris Motors in Birmingham, married Florence Andrews in 1925 and they had one child. Adrian married Ginty Tollerton and in addition to Ginty's existing child there were two children Audrey and June. Adrian worked as a Civil Servant, in the Labour Exchange and in due course with the National Health Service. Edith Junior, unmarried, produced one daughter, Elizabeth known as Betty. She became a civil servant in London. Evelyn and Erik had three sons. Frank, who followed a career in banking, becoming Chief Cashier of the Royal Bank of Scotland in London, married Florence Defies and she produced one son. Iris married Arthur Brown, a Dumfries newspaperman who worked for the Dumfries Courier and Herald, and they had six children. Violet married Alfred Jones a Birmingham motor manufacturer and they had three sons. Valentine Fisher, who worked in the London financial world, married Nora and they had a son and a daughter. Between them Edith's sons and daughters produced 28 grandchildren for her. The 28 grandchildren have in turn generated over 40 great grandchildren [ 4.].

Edith and Pearson's family seem to have been very happy and mutually-supportive. Edith's interests centred firmly on them and their well-being and she is not remembered as having had many outside interests, though with Pearson an elder in the Catholic Apostolic church she seems to have been reasonably devout. Some of her children remembered her under the name Birdie, a nickname that derived from a song her husband used to sing about her. Others remembered a less complementary name `Cakeface', deriving from her stern demeanour when something did not please her.

Pearson remained as technical manager at Arrol-Johnston until his retirement in 1929 at the age of 71, dying at the age of 73 in 1931. By this time most of Edith and Pearson's family had left home, though Pearson Junior and his family now lived with them in Dumfries, where he ran the British Legion branch. Iris had married a local man Arthur Brown and by now also lived with Edith in the old family home at Stanley Villa. On the death of Pearson Senior the family had to vacate Stanley Villa, owned by the Arrol­Johnston Company and Edith moved with Iris, Bill and their growing family to Nunholme, on the banks of the Nith just north of Dumfries. Edith spent the declining years of her life in Iris's household.

Arthur Brown in due course was appointed editor of the Linlithgow Gazette, necessitating their move to a new home at Bridge House, Linlithgow Bridge in West Lothian, and Edith accompanied them there, quietly enjoying watching another generation of her family growing and maturing. She had been used to a life with the help of servants and found the need to fit in with the busy routines of a large family and help with the household chores somewhat irksome. She died at Bridge House in February 1944 and was buried next to her husband Pearson in a family grave in Troqueer Churchyard near Maxwelltown in Dumfries.

Notes

] Details given here of Edith's early life are closely based, with corrections, on an account prepared by Guy Martin Martin and Timothy Family Histories (Sections Timothy Family 6: Peter Vincent Timothy and Elizabeth Hutchins and 9: Edith Lizette Timothy. www.martinfamilyhistory.co.uk

[ 1.    ] For an account of Pearson Fisher see P V Addyman, 2008. Pearson Fisher

[ 2.           Information about the career of Pearson Fisher is based on a newspaper obituary (source unknown) subsequent to his death in September 1931.

[ 3.    ] Edith and Pearson's descendants:

4. ]  Edith and Pearson’s descendants:

1. Pearson Vincent Fisher (1892 -1985)
    m. Mary Ronald McIntyre McKie  1925

   1.1 Jane Dorothy -  (d of MRM McM, took name of Fisher in 1935)

   1.2 Pearson Ronald (New Zealand, then Towoomba, Australia)

   1.3 Vera Mary (lived in New York)

   1.4 Poppy Lizette (lived in Dumfries)

   1.5 William Campbell (lives New Abbey, Dumfries)

   1.6 Evelyn Constance

   1.7 Joseph Timothy

2. Thomas Chamley Fisher (1893 - 1962)
    m. Florence Andrews 1925
 
    1.1 Cynthia Florence

3. Adrian Cecil Fisher (? 1895 - 1950     )
    m.( Ginty Tollerton) ; m. secondly to ?

    3.1 Tam
   
    3.2  Audrey (died 1950s)

    3.3  June (1930 -    )(lives with second husband Bulawayo, Zimbabwe)

4. Edith Isabella Fisher (? 1897 - ?    )

    4.1  Elizabeth (Betty)  (took name of foster family Lawlor )

5. Evelyn Mary Addyman, nee Fisher (1898 - 1962)
    m. Erik Thomas Waterhouse Addyman 1920

    5.1 James Cadwalader Addyman  (1923 - 2002) (m. Cynthia Fisher, lived Starbeck and Copgrove, 1 son, 1 daughter)

   5.2 Oscar Thomas Addyman (1924 -      ) (m. Marion Hutton, lived various places, latterly  Kennford, Exeter, 2 sons and 5 daughters)

   5.3 Peter Vincent Addyman  (1939 -    )(m. Shelton Oliver, lived latterly York; 1 son, 1 daughter)

6. Frank Amstel Fisher (? 1899 - 1960s   )
    m. Florence Defries

   6.1 Pearson Fisher (     -    ) (lived Oxted, Surrrey;
      m. Patricia, son Ian)

7. Violet Laura Jones, nee Fisher (1900 - ?    )
    m. Alfred Jones

   7.1 Valentine ((1925 - 1990s)
      m. firstly Hilda,; divorced, m.secondly.

   7.2 Adrian

   7.3 Ian (lives Coventry)

8. Iris Jessie Brown, nee Fisher (  1905 - 1963)
    m. 9th August 1925 Arthur William Brown MBE (1890 - 1971)
   8.1 Iris Ellen MBE (1925 - ) (lives Linlithgow,  daughters Iris, Carol, son Tom ?)
   8.2 Joseph William Houston (1927 - 1983?) (lived Canada, 3 daughters Christina           (Canada) Juliana (London) Carmen (Canada)) d.ca.1983)
   8.3. Ann Edith (died aged 3 days 1934: buried Troqueer churchyard)
   8.4 Henry Semple  (1930 - 2005?) (daughter Violet (d. of Margaret Morgan). Violet had 2 daughters India and Shannon and one son Alistair)
   8.5 Dorothy Ann (1935 -      )(m. Frederick Marriott; sons Peter, Ian and John)
   8.6 Barbara Evelyn (1938 -     )(m. William Braithwaite; son Charles )
9. Valentine Fisher   ( - ? - )
    m. Nora (daughter of a ship or boat captain)
   9.1  David Fisher (   -   ) (lives San Fransisco)
   9.2 Jane Fisher (     -     ) (m. Robert Ingram, lives Mereworth, Maidstone )
10. Archibald Fisher ( ? - ? ) (? name )
      died in infancy
 

End of section contributed by P V Addyman

THOMAS FISHER The earliest Fisher that has been traced (though I cannot vouch for the detail until Pearson Fisher, who married Edith Lizette Timothy) was christened on 25 July 1698 and married Margret Gibson about 1727/27. There were five children, Mary, born 30 March 1728, Richard, born 27 July 1731,

JOSEPH, born 26 April 1733, Thomas, born 1735, and Bridget, born 2 March 1739/1740.

JOSEPH FISHER and ELIZABETH KELLET

Joseph married Elizabeth Kellet on 16 April 1763, place unknown, and there were four children, Thomas, born 26 December 1763, James, born 12 February 1769, Anne, born 1775 and JOSEPH, born 1777.

JOSEPH FISHER and MARY HARTLEY

Joseph married Mary Hartley on 7 May 1806 and there were eight children. Anne, born 18 September 1806, Mary, born 10 November 1809, Elanor, born 26 August 1812, Margaret, born 17 January 1814, Joseph, born 13 January 1816, Philip, born 19 October 1817, Agnes, born 1 March 1818 and THOMAS, born 4 November 1820.

THOMAS FISHER (1820 - 1893) and ISABELLA CHARNLEY (1829 - ??)

Thomas married Isabella Charnley, born 1828, and there were six children. Pearson, born 27 March 1858, Joseph James, born 1855 - died 19 August 1931, Mary, born 1860 - died 10 October 1890, William Kellet, born 1863 - died 22 October 1899 , John Chamely, born 27 August 1853 - died 20 March 1876, and Ann Maria, born Abt 1857 - died 1881. Thomas died on 15 May 1893 and Isabella on 8 October 1903. Isabella's parents were John Charnley and Ann Pearson

PEARSON VINCENT FISHER (1892 - 1985) and MARY RONALD McINTYRE McKIE (1895 - 1989)

Pearson Vincent Fisher, son of Pearson Fisher and Edith Lizette Timothy married Mary Ronald McIntyre McKie in 1925 and there were seven children Jane Dorothy, Pearson Ronald, Vera Mary, Poppy Lissette, William Campbell, Evelyn Constance, and Joseph Timothy, also half sister Dorothy. He was in the British Army and lost a leg in the Dardanelles during World War I. We have a photo of him found in my mother's files. (M I Martin) He was known as Pearie in our family.

JANE DOROTHY (1922 - ) No information.

PEARSON RONALD FISHER, (1926 - ) VALERIE PATRICA WELLS ( ?? - 1962) & KAYE ELIZABETH KENT

Pearson Ronald Fisher, the second child and first son of Pearson Vincent Fisher and Mary Ronald McIntyre McKie married Valerie Patrica Wells in 1954 at Hokitika, NZ. There were two daughters, Jennifer Kay and Suzanne. His first wife, Valerie died in 1962. Pearson remarried, later in 1964, to Kaye Elizabeth Kent at Wairoa NZ and there are two sons, Kent Vincent and Craig Ronald, They still live in New Zealand.

 

VERA MAY (1927 - ) No information.

POPPY FISHER, (1930 - ) , ?? CHARTERS AND KEN SPRECKLEY

Poppy Lissette, the fourth child of Pearson Vincent Fisher and Mary Ronald McIntyre McKie is now married to Ken Spreckley. There are several children by her first marriage.

OF THE REST NO INFORMATION William Campbell, Evelyn Constance, and Joseph Timothy, also half sister Dorothy.

THOMAS CHAMELY FISHER (1893 -1962) & FLORENCE ANDREWS (?? -??)

Thomas was born in Liverpool and married Florence in 1925 at Southport, Lancs.

One daughter, Cynthia Florence  she married James Cadwallader Addyman - See under Evelyn Mary Fisher & Erik Waterhouse Addyman for more information

EDITH ISABELLA (?? - ??) Has a daughter.

ADRIAN CECIL (?? - ??) Had a daughter, Audrey and another, name unknown.

EVELYN MARY FISHER (1898 - 1962) and ERIK THOMAS WATERHOUSE ADDYMAN (1889 - 1963)

Erik married Evelyn Mary Fisher, having three sons, James Cadwallader, Oscar Thomas and Peter Vincent. Erik was a Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineer, the family lived at Belmont Villa, Starbeck, and also at The White House, Harrogate. He worked for the Admiralty, LNER and various aircraft firms, Armstrong Whitworth. Arroll Johnson, etc.

From THE YORKSHIRE POST of August 19 1989 BARKERS YORKSHIRE

"Pioneer who preferred gliders to cars The more is learned about Mr Erik Addyman, the more the heart warms towards him. He was an intrepid pioneer aviator, soaring over Yorkshire on gliders put together in his billiards room. He made his own motor cars, and one let him down he simply abandoned it, walling it up in his garage.

Late in life he took to attending public inquires and putting up ideas which were beyond the wit and imagination of local bureaucrats. It is the centenary of his birth this year. His parents lived at Belmont House, Starbeck , Harrogate. His father, a solicitor, was Norwegian Vice-Consul (hence Erik not Eric).

He was an engineering genius. During the First World War, then still in his 20's, he was at the School of mines in Portsmouth working on the development of such weapons as the depth charge. He later designed an aircraft engine at the Arrol Johnson wworks in Dumfries, Scotland, and perfected a carburettor. By the 1920's he was back at Starbeck, and working with the London and North Easten Railway.

According to Mr Gordon Beer, the historian of Starbeck, he served as locomotive superintendent at Starbeck and at Neville Hill, Leeds. Inevitably, he was all for innovation and an early advocate of diesel locomotion.

He loved the Dales and enjoyed potholing and climbing, becoming so skilled at the latter that he was the reserve for the Mallory-Irvine attempt on Everest in 1924. He is also said to be the first to go skiing in Yorkshire, and hurried up Nidderdale as soon as there was a decent covering of snow.

This splendid man will not subside into obscurity thanks to Mr Beer, who tells his story in his book, "More about a Village Called Starbeck". Mr Beer is in turn indebted to Police Box, the magazine of the North Yorkshire force, which told how one of the cars built by Mr Addyman was found in the place where it had been emtombed by its owner. In 1968, when Belmont House at Statbeck was demolished, a policeman called Alan Lane heard talk of a racing car walled up somewhere on the premises. He got permission to look round and, with Holsian perspicacity, he saw that the inside of the garage was fully a yard shorter than the outside. Eventually he found a hole and by the light of his torch, glimped the rear end of a car. It was an Addyman Vortex, a single seater with wheels almost as tall as its bonnet. He bought it for £10, and it has now been restored. Only one other Addyman car is known to have survived.

The Starbeck find was apparently interred after its brakes failed and Mr Addyman brought it to a halt by ramming a wall. Having thus transgressed, the vehicle was put away.

He had more serious trouble with one of the gliders he assembled from bits and pieces made in his billiards room. To judge from a photograph in Mr Beers book they were crazy affairs, merely a long flimsy wing and a tail linked by a single strut. It appears that the aviator travelled face down in a kind of hammock slung under the wing.

In 1932 Erik Addyman crashed one of these creations on the North York Moors. He broke both legs and damaged his right arm so severely that it had to be amputated. It is a mark of the man that in spite of the terrifing crash, and its dire consequences, as soon as he sufficiently recovered, he was airborne in another of his gliders.

Ekik Addyman died in1963, aged 74. An affectionate obituary called him a controversialist in the pleasanter sense. It was his habit to write letters to newspapers on the subjects of the day, and to attend public inquires where he often countered official proposals with his own ingenious suggestions. The harassed officials could probably done without his ideas, but they could have scarcely have helped liking the man" - Malcolm Barker

JAMES CADWLLADER ADDYMAN (1923 - ) & CYNTHIA FLORENCE FISHER (1930 -)

James & Cynthia were married in 1965 at Southport and have two children, Robert James (1969 -) & Rosemary Anne (1971 -)

OSCAR THOMAS ADDYMAN (1924 - ) AND MARION HUTTON

Oscar, the second son of Erik T. W. Addyman and Evelyn Mary Fisher was born in 1924. He married Marion Hutton. There were 7 children, Susan Diana, Hazel Miriam, Patrica Anne, Peter Erik, Michael Lee Oscar and Christina Louise. He was a Water Engineer and they now live near Exeter.

PETER VINCENT ADDYMAN, CBE, MA, D. Sc., FSA, MIFA(1939 - ) and SHELTON OLIVER

He married Shelton Oliver of Atlanta, USA. There are two children, Thomas Oliver and Susannah.

 Details below from (partly)" Who's Who" & "Whoswho in the World" ADDYMAN, Peter Vincent, CBE, FSA; Director, York Archaeological Trust since 1972; educated at Sedburgh School; Peterhouse, Cambridge (MA). MIFA 1982; FSA 1967; Ast. Lecturer in Archaeology 1962-64. Lecturer 1964-67 University of Southampton 1967-72. Hon Fellow University of York 1972-; Hon Reader University of Bradford 1974-81 Directed excavations including: Maxey, Lydford, Lugershall Castle, Chalton. Vice President Council for British Archaeology 1981-85 (President 1992-95). Jt. Instigator Jorvik Viking Centre, York. Hon D Sc. Bradford 1984; D Univ, York 1985. He lists as recreations - gardening, watercolours and travel.

Thomas Oliver Addyman, MA (1967 - ) is married to Bella Zvegintzo and there are four children, Oscar (1992 -), Oliver (1994 - ), Harry (1998 -  ) and Tatiana (2001 - ). Thomas is a Historic Buildings Conservator

Oscar Addyman (1992 - )

Oliver Addyman (1994 - )

Harry Addyman (1998 -  )

Tatiana Addyman (2001 - )

 

Susannah Mary Addyman, MA (1969 - ) is in the Fire Service in Atlanta , USA.

FRANK FISHER (?? - ??) and FLORENCE DEFRIES (?? - ??)

Have a son, Pearson, married to Patricia Kelly, they have a son, Ian.

VIOLET LAURA FISHER (?? - ??) and ALF JONES There are three children Val, Adnan and Ian.

IRIS JESSIE FISHER (?? - ??) and ARTHUR WILLIAM BROWN MBE (1871 - 1963)

Arthur, born 8 June 1871 married Iris Jessie Fisher and there were six children, Iris Ellen, William Houston, Ann Edith, Henry Semple, Dorothy Ann and Barbara Eveline. Arthur died 6 May 1963.

IRIS ELLEN BROWN MBE & THOMAS ALEXANDRA McGOWRAN MBE

Iris married Thomas McGowran on 12 December 1946 at the Craigmailen Church, Linlithgow, Scotland and there were four children, Thomas Edward Arthur, Iris Ann Margaret, Carol Laura Evelyne and Fiona Mary Lucy.

VALENTINE CRAIG FISHER (?? - ??) and NORA Had two children, David and Jane.

ARCHIBALD FISHER (?? - ??) Said to have died aged about four.

......................................

JAMES FISHER & JAMES FISHER SHIPPING LINE

General History

Jame's Fisher founded his shipping firm in 1847, when Barrow was still a village. Early work included the transport of iron ore and Kirkby slate from piers laid out in the Barrow Channel. James Fisher & Sons became the shipping agents for the Barrow Haematite Steel Company in the 1860s and agents for Lloyds in 1872. Most of the fleet were wooden sailing schooners and at this time the firm only part owned them, offering shares in each vessel to investors.

When the shipbuilder Rawlinson retired in 1868, James Fisher & Sons bought his slipway at Hindpool (just along the sea wall from the museum) where the Fisher fleet was repaired and a few new vessels were built. This enterprise was known as the Furness Shipbuilding Company In 1889 it moved to a larger yard nearby (the former Ashburner shipyard) but was closed in 1899. By the end of the 19th century the Fisher fleet included steamships and the firm had branched out into carrying a wide range of products around the British coast. Steel transport was still the single biggest factor, but among other products carried was wood pulp for the Salthouse Paperworks and crude oil to the Barrow Island Petroleum Depot.

During the Great War (1 9 14-1 8), James Fisher & Sons had two vessels sunk by German submarines. The early 1920's was a low ebb for the firm, with as few as a dozen vessels in service. The firm's last sailing vessel, 'British Queen', was sold in 1924. Recovery for the company came in the 1930's and they began to concentrate on carrying special cargoes without the need for dismantling. These were called indivisible loads and James Fisher & Sons gained this expertise by transporting field guns and gun turrets for Vickers.

After the Second World War the firm made a deliberate move to expand from purely coastal trade to become an international company. Various types of work undertaken since then include: *Freight to the Mediterranean, Middle East and Caribbean

*North Sea oilfield work in conjunction with Vickers Oceanics

*Terminals at Whitehaven, Heysham and Ellesmere Port *Transport of spent nuclear fuel

*Indivisible loads such as railway locomotives and building blocks for power stations under construction

*Management of Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels

*Thames river bus service The 1970's and 1980's were a period of many projects, some short-term contracts and the buying and selling of companies and property.

 

For a few years in the mid- 1 980s, when the firm were owners of Denton's Wharf on the River Thames, they were even landlords of the 'Ship and Lobster' pub!

 

James Fisher & Sons have always had their headquarters in Barrow - first in a cottage on Fisher Street, then at Fisher's Buildings on The Strand (1866), and now in Fisher House, on Michaelson Road (1965). It was a Fisher vessel, 'W and M.' which was the first to enter Devonshire Dock on 24th August 1867. As other panels describe, there have been strong civic connections with Barrow in each generation of the Fisher family.

This link is preserved today with the Sir John Fisher Foundation, which amongst other works makes donations to local charities and organisations.

Some additional information below, but will be some duplicate of above.

Joseph and Ann. James and Ann had 8 children, Joseph, John, James, Ann, Elizabeth, Mary, Bridget & Isabella.

JAMES FISHER 1822 - 1873
The founder of Jarnes Fisher & Sons in 1847. As well as his shipping interests, James was involved in the civic affairs of Barrow and was a member of the first town council. During the 1860s he moved to Northern Ireland and bought the Claggan Estate in County Antrim. His health began to fail in 1871 and he returned to Barrow where he died at 'West View', Longreins Road, Barrow on 16th January, 1873. General History Jame's Fisher founded his shipping firm in 1847, when Barrow was still a village. Early work included the transport of iron ore and Kirkby slate from piers laid out in the Barrow Channel. James Fisher & Sons became the shipping agents for the Barrow Haematite Steel Company in the 1860s and agents for Lloyds in 1872. Most of the fleet were wooden sailing schooners and at this time the firm only part owned them, offering shares in each vessel to investors. When the shipbuilder Rawlinson retired in 1868, James Fisher & Sons bought his slipway at Hindpool (just along the sea wall from the museum) where the Fisher fleet was repaired and a few new vessels were built. This enterprise was known as the Furness Shipbuilding Company In 1889 it moved to a larger yard nearby (the former Ashburner shipyard) but was closed in 1899. By the end of the 19th century the Fisher fleet included steamships and the firm had branched out into carrying a wide range of products around the British coast. Steel transport was still the single biggest factor, but among other products carried was wood pulp for the Salthouse Paperworks and crude oil to the Barrow Island Petroleum Depot. During the GreatWar (1 9 14-1 8), James Fisher & Sons had two vessels sunk by German submarines. The early 1920's was a low ebb for the firm, with as few as a dozen vessels in service. The firm's last sailing vessel, 'British Queen', was sold in 1924. Recovery for the company came in the 1930's and they began to concentrate on carrying special cargoes without the need for dismantling. These were called indivisible loads and james Fisher & Sons gained this expertise by transporting field guns and gun turrets for Vickers. After the Second World War the firm made a deliberate move to expand from purely coastal trade to become an international company. Various types of work undertaken since then include: *Freight to the Mediterranean, Middle East and Caribbean *North Sea oilfield work in conjuction with Vickers Oceanics *Terminals at Whitehaven, Heysham and Ellesmere Port *Transport of spent nuclear fuel *Indivisible loads such as railway locomotives and building blocks for power stations under construction *Managementof Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels *Thames river bus service The 1970's and 1980's were a period of many projects, some short-term contracts and the buying and selling of companies and property. For a few years in the mid 1980s, when the firm were owners of Denton's Wharf on the River Thames, they were even landlords of the 'Ship and Lobster' pub! James Fisher & Sons have always had their headquarters in Barrow - first in a cottage on Fisher Street, then at Fisher's Buildings on The Strand (1866), and now in Fisher House, on Michaelson Road (1 965). It was a Fisher vessel, 'W and M.].' which was the first to enter Devonshire Dock on 24th August 1867. As other panels describe, there have been strong civic connections with Barrow in each generation of the Fisher family This link is preserved today with the Sir John Fisher Foundation, which amongst other works makes donations to local charities and organisations.

James Christened 16th March 1822
Married 14th June 1843
Ann Lowry

JAMES FISHER 1822 - 1873 The founder of Jarnes Fisher & Sons in 1847. As well as his shipping interests, James was involved in the civic affairs of Barrow and was a member of the first town council. During the 1860s he moved to Northern Ireland and bought the Claggan Estate in County Antrim. His health began to fail in 1871 and he returned to Barrow where he died at 'West View' on 16th January, 1873.

JOSEPH FISHER 1844 - 1901 The eldest son of James Fisher, he remained in Barrow to oversee the company's interests when his father went to live in Ireland. He too became a town councillor between 1871-1876. However he was more interested in his social life than company business. He was an accomplished horseman and spent much of his time in the saddle. Rather than be at work he was often found in the snug of the 'Ship Inn', which was adjacent to the Fisher Offices. After five years in charge he left the company in financial difficulties and sold his interest to his two brothers. He died in Belfast in 1901.

 

JOHN FISHER 1850-1900 The fourth child and second eldest son of James Fisher. He had gone to Ireland with his father and had become responsible for the extensive iron ore mining business that the family had developed. He and his younger brother James returned to Barrow in 1878 to take charge of the company's affairs. They bought out their elder brother with financial help from the Barrow Haematite Steel Company, for whom James Fisher & Sons were shipping agents. John took on the task of restoring the ailing shipping interests. He cleared outstanding liabilities and began a programme of expansion but suffered a nervous breakdown in 1893. He continued the family connection with the town council in Barrow and was elected Mayor from 1894-1897.

 

A passionate golfer, he caught pneumonia whilst out on the course and died in June 1900.

 

JAMES FISHER 1854 - 1 915 The sixth child of James Fisher. Although born and educated in Barrow he spent much of his time caring for the family estates in Claggan until his enforced return in 1878. Married in 1883, he setup home at 'Salthouse Villa' and later 'Drumard' on Abbey Road in Barrow. James learnt the shipping business at the side of elder brother John and took over running the business after the latter's breakdown in 1893.

 

On his brother's death in 1900 James became responsible for both the shipping business and the Glenravil Mines. The connection with the town council was continued and he was unanimously elected Mayor of Barrow for 1902-3. He showed a keen interest in the Church, being a churchwarden at St. Paul's and the manager of Newbarns Church of England Day School for more than twenty years. James Fisher's other interests included angling and he was president of the Barrow Angling Association. A keen sportsman, he raised sporting dogs and continued his elder brother Joseph's interest in horses. He was the owner of the first vehicle registered in Barrow James Fisher died ta 'Drumard in November 1915.

 

SIR JOHN FISHER and MARIA ELSNER (LADY FISHER) Sir John Fisher was born on 3rd July 1892 at 202 Abbey Road, the fourth child and eldest son of James Fisher. He was educated at Sedburgh and Malvern, leaving school at 17 to train as a mining engineer at the family estates in Northern Ireland before joining his father in the shipping business in 1914. He and his younger brother James enlisted in the Territorial Army and on the outbreak of the First World War were immediately called up. John was serving at Avelui on the Somme as acting Staff Captain when news of his father's death reached him.

He returned to Barrow to take control of the family firm and co-ordinated its war effort and the import of iron ore from Spain and Norway, which kept in operation 35 blast furnaces between Carnforth and Workington, before returning to the front. His brother James was invalided home but on recovery was put in charge of a workers battalion in Liverpool where he contracted pneumonia and died in 1919. Once again John was sent home on "short compassionate leave" and it was not until 26th January 1919 that he was finally released from war service.

 

Purchasing the interest of his late brother James he became sole proprietor of James Fisher & Sons;, guiding it through the difficult post-war years and the final changeover from sail to steam. The fast sailing vessel, 'British Queen' was disposed of in 1924 and the firm was reconstituted in 1926 as a private limited company. John Fisher became a member of the Chamber of Shipping of the United Kingdom and was vice-chairman from 1929-35 and chairman from 1935-1939 of its coasting and home trade section. On the outbreak of war he was recruited by the Ministry of War Transport as Director of the Coasting and Short Sea Division. Two of the most difficult jobs he tackled were 'Operation Dynamo', the evacuation of Dunkirk and 'Operation Neptune', the nautical part of the D-Day landings.

For his war service he was knighted in 1942 and received decorations from France, the Netherlands, Spain and Portugal. He married the famous Viennese opera singer Maria Eisner on 24th January 194 7. Their home was 'Blakeholme Wray', by the side of Windermere, purchased from Sir Charles Craven, the Managing Director of Vickers Shipyard . He retired as Chairman of J. Fisher & Sons in 1976 and finally left the Board of Directors in 198 1. Sir John was made a Freeman of the Borough of Barrow-in-Furness in 1978.

Sir John Fisher and Lady Maria

Maria Elsner

 

Photo of John and Maria Fisher taken in Nassau, Bahamas circa 1965.
The lady between them was Anna Michaelides.

 

He and his wife were found dead at their Windermere home on 7th November, 1983.

Shipping magnate and wife found dead

THE MAN who masterminded, the gathering of the "Little Ships" for the rescue of British troops from the Dunkirk beaches was found dead in, bed with his wife yesterday. The bodies of Sir John Fisher, 91, a Cumbrian shipping magnate, and Lady, Maria 78, were found by their chauffeur at their country home, Blakeholme Wray, Newby Bridge. Police found. two notes and crime is not suspected. Sir John, president of James Fisher and Sons, who ship nuclear waste to the Windscale nuclear plant for treatment , was director of the Coastal and Short Sea division of the Ministry of War Transport. In this role, he organised the civilian shipping rescue operation for the Dunkirk evacuation, for which he was knighted.

Sir John's family solicitor, Mr. Hart Jackson, of Barrow-in-Furness, said he last saw the couple at their home ten days ago. "There was some business to do and they were not really well enough to come to the office. But they were both fine and were in good form when I saw them," he said. "Up to a year ago he was still going into the office. But this last year he has been more or less confined to bed." Mr. Jackson said Lady Maria had a hip injury recently and was in considerable pain "'She could walk, but it was very difficult," he said. Lady Maria, who married Sir John in 1947, was an opera Singer who, during the Second World War, hosted her own BBC radio programme of light music.

 

Some other Fisher information being update fro time to time.

Rev Thomas Fisher - “PROSPECT”

The early history of “Prospect” is quite difficult to follow, but it seems to have been part of the Cockfish Hall estate.

“Prospect” is mentioned in an old deed of 1625 as belonging to John Parker and Thomas Postlethwaite. By 1743, it belonged to Roger Parker, and after being mortgaged several times, was conveyed to John Pearson in 1783. Having been leased and mortgaged again, it passed in 1789 to the Rev. Thomas Pearson, vicar of Kirkby Ireleth, who died in 1832, the property eventually coming to his son William Kirkby Pearson.

Named on maps of the day as “Prospect Cottage”, the 1841 census gives the inhabitants as William Woodend, farmer, and his wife Isabella, a female servant and an elderly lodger. The Woodends were daughter and son-in-law of the Rev. Thomas Pearson. By 1851 things had changed significantly, and two properties were mentioned. “Prospect House” was inhabited by the Woodends, now farming 28 acres, and employing a house servant of 16, and a 10 year old farmboy.
 

By 1861,William Kirkby Pearson, son of the Rev. Thomas Pearson had set himself up in “Prospect House”. He was 66, unmarried, and giving his occupation as Landed Proprietor, sharing the house with a 42 year old farm servant from Torver, a 45 year old housekeeper from Millom, and a 20yearold local servant girl.

The census of 1851 finds William Kirkby Pearson still inhabiting “Prospect House” as a Retired Draper and Landowner', employing the same housekeeper and a young domestic servant. However this is the last time we find him, as he dies in December 1871, aged 77 years. In “Prospect Cottage” is Richard Rogers, the curate of Kirkby, born in Norton, Somerset, his wife Elizabeth, a native of Walsingham in Norfolk, and a visitor from Gloucestershire.

 

 

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